Brian D. Feinstein

Brian D. Feinstein
  • Assistant Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    660 Jon M. Huntsman Hall

Research Interests: financial regulation, administrative law, agency design, empirical legal studies

Links: CV, SSRN page

Overview

Brian D. Feinstein examines how the structure of financial regulators and other government agencies that regulate business affect outcomes. A political scientist and lawyer by training, Dr. Feinstein’s research incorporates insights from administrative law and the social sciences. His scholarship has been published in the Columbia Law ReviewJournal of Empirical Legal Studies, Journal of Financial Regulation, and University of Pennsylvania Law Review, among other journals, and has been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and other national publications.

EDUCATION

J.D., Harvard Law School

Ph.D. in Government, Harvard University

B.A. in Economics and Political Science, Brown University

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Bigelow Fellow & Lecturer in Law, the University of Chicago Law School

Attorney, Arnold & Porter LLP (serving as outside counsel to the Federal Housing Finance Agency)

Law Clerk, the Hon. John Daniel Tinder, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit

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Research

Dr. Feinstein’s current research projects involve public perceptions of regulatory agencies, congressional intent in passing financial legislation, reforming the Community Reinvestment Act, and the interplay between state politics and mortgage finance.

Awards and Honors

  • Holmes-Cardozo Outstanding Research Award, Academy of Legal Studies in Business Annual Conference, 2019
  • Mack Institute Research Fellowship (joint with Kevin Werbach), 2019
  • Wharton Teaching Excellence Award, AY 2021, AY 2020, 2020-2022

Activity

Latest Research

Brian Feinstein and Jennifer Nou (2022), Submerged Independent Agencies, University of Pennsylvania Law Review.
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In the News

Why Regulation Won’t Harm Cryptocurrencies

Measures that protect investors and weed out bad actors will boost confidence in cryptocurrencies and help the industry to grow, according to Wharton’s Brian Feinstein and Kevin Werbach.Read More

Knowledge at Wharton - 4/27/2021
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