William R. Heaston

William R. Heaston
  • PhD Student

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    Jon. M. Huntsman Hall, Suite 600
    3730 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: Corruption, anti-corruption law/strategy, corporate crime, corporate compliance, organizational theory.

Links: CV

Overview

William Heaston is a third-year doctoral student and Winkelman Fellow in Applied Economics in the Legal Studies & Business Ethics Department.  He is also pursuing his law degree at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.  His research interests lie at the intersection of law, ethics, and organization theory.  Currently, he is most interested in issues pertaining to corruption, anti-corruption law/strategy, and corporate crime and compliance.

Will has worked in multiple levels of the federal judiciary, interning for judges on the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, Southern District of Iowa, and Central District of Illinois. He also previously conducted research for a management consulting firm in Des Moines, Iowa. He holds a B.A. from Drake University and an M.A. from the University of Sussex.

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Knowledge@Wharton

The High Cost of Returns: Should Retailers Rethink Their Policies?

Easy returns are great for shoppers, but they are becoming a bigger financial liability for stores. New research co-authored by Wharton’s Tom Robertson explains why it’s time for retailers to rethink their liberal return policies.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/08/10
Why CLOs Will Not Cause the Next Financial Crisis

Collateralized loan obligations (CLOs) are increasingly viewed as a major threat to the U.S. financial system. However, “the recent hysteria around CLOs is misplaced,” write Wharton’s Michael R. Roberts and Michael Schwert.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/08/10
Too Much of a Good Thing? The Perils of Overconfidence

Wharton’s Katherine Milkman talks with Don Moore from the University of California, Berkeley, about his new book, ‘Perfectly Confident,’ and what happens when our confidence level doesn’t match up with reality.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/08/10