Christina Skinner

Christina Skinner
  • Assistant Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    Room 667 Jon M. Huntsman Hall

Links: CV

Overview

Christina Skinner’s research interests lie at the intersection of law and global financial markets and institutions. Professor Skinner has particular expertise in financial stability. Her scholarship examines a range of questions concerning the structure of legal frameworks which are designed to address emerging risks to financial stability—especially and including risks emerging outside of the banking sector; risks in the fintech space; and risks in connection with the debt cycle. Related to this work, she also studies conduct and culture in global banking institutions. Skinner’s work is international and comparative in scope, drawing on her several years of experience as an academic and regulator in the United Kingdom. She is or has previously contributed to policy working groups at the Financial Stability Board and the U.K. Banking Standards Board.

Prior to joining the faculty at Wharton, Professor Skinner served as legal counsel at the Bank of England, in the Financial Stability Division of the Bank’s Legal Directorate. Her work there focused principally on matters of bank resolution, financial market infrastructure, and macroprudential policy. Previously, Professor Skinner was an Academic Visitor at the University of Oxford, Faculty of Law and a Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics, Law Department. From 2014-2016, she was a post-doctoral fellow and lecturer in Law at Columbia Law School.

Professor Skinner received her J.D. from Yale Law School, and an A.B. from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, with a concentration in international economics. She received certificates of proficiency in European Politics and Society, and Spanish Language and Culture.

EDUCATION

J.D., Yale Law School
A.B., the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

ACADEMIC POSITIONS

Visiting Fellow, London School of Economics, Law Department (2017)

Academic Visitor, University of Oxford, Faculty of Law (2017)

Columbia Law School, Post-doctoral Fellow and Lecturer in Law (2014 – 2016)

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • LGST243 - OTHER PEOPLE'S MONEY

    We learn in introductory economics courses that money is fungible: that is, one dollar is as good as the next. Indeed, using money as a "medium of exchange" is one of its defining characteristics. But what happens when we take a big pile of money and put it in different buckets. On one bucket we might write "hedge fund"; on another, "central bank"; on still another, "payday lender." Then money starts to change in ways defined by law, history, ethics, and politics. This course will take you on a tour of these different buckets--different kinds of financial institutions, broadly defined--throughout the modern financial system. We will look at hedge funds, insurance companies, investment banks, sovereign wealth funds, central banks, consumer banks, payday lenders, state-sponsored enterprises (like the Export-Import Bank in the United States and much of the financial system in China), and the cutting edge of fintech, including crowd-funded lending, digital currencies, and more. In each case, students will be exposed to a series of specialized questions: Where did this institution come from? What problem is it trying to solve that other alternatives could not resolve? What is the basic business (or, where relevant, regulatory) model for each institution? How is each institution regulated, and by whom? What are the ethical considerations in each context? What are the political considerations that each market participant faces?

  • LGST612 - RESPONSIBILITY IN BUS.

    This course introduces students to important ethical and legal challenges they will face as leaders in business. The course materials will be useful to students preparing for managerial positions that are likely to place them in advisory and/or agency roles owing duties to employers, clients, suppliers, and customers. Although coverage will vary depending on instructor, the focus of the course will be on developing skills in ethical and legal analyses that can assist managers as they make both individual-level and firm-level decisions about the responsible courses of action when duties, loyalties, rules, norms, and interests are in conflict. For example, the rules of insider trading may form the basis for lessons in some sections. Group assignments, role-plays, and case studies may, at the instructor's discretion, be used to help illustrate the basic theoretical frameworks. Course materials will highlight industry codes and professional norms, as well as the importance of personal and/or religious values. Format: class participation, quiz, group report, and final paper or exam. Materials: coursepack. Prerequisites: none.

  • LGST643 - OTHER PEOPLE'S MONEY

    We learn in introductory economics courses that money is fungible: that is, one dollar is as good as the next. Indeed, using money as a "medium of exchange" is one of its defining characteristics. But what happens when we take a big pile of money and put it in different buckets. On one bucket we might write "hedge fund"; on another, "central bank"; on still another, "payday lender." Then money starts to change in ways defined by law, history, ethics, and politics. This course will take you on a tour of these different buckets--different kinds of financial institutions, broadly defined--throughout the modern financial system. We will look at hedge funds, insurance companies, investment banks, sovereign wealth funds, central banks, consumer banks, payday lenders, state-sponsored enterprises (like the Export-Import Bank in the United States and much of the financial system in China), and the cutting edge of fintech, including crowd-funded lending, digital currencies, and more. In each case, students will be exposed to a series of specialized questions: Where did this institution come from? What problem is it trying to solve that other alternatives could not resolve? What is the basic business (or, where relevant, regulatory) model for each institution? How is each institution regulated, and by whom? What are the ethical considerations in each context? What are the political considerations that each market participant faces?

Knowledge@Wharton

A Middle-class Tax Cut: Weighing the Costs and Benefits

Trump’s “Tax Cuts 2.0” would swell the federal debt, but the U.S. economy would see both short- and long-term gains, according to an analysis by the Penn Wharton Budget Model.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/11/19
Do Foreign Firms Thrive in Immigrant Enclaves? O Da!

New research coauthored by Wharton's Exequiel (Zeke) Hernandez looks at why, and under what circumstances, foreign firms boost their performance when they move into areas inhabited by immigrants from their home countries.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/11/18
How to Get Corporate Strategy to Engage with Climate Change

Climate change is becoming an emergency around the world. So why doesn’t it get more priority among corporate strategy executives? Oxford University’s Rafael Ramirez poses and answers that question in this opinion piece.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/11/15