Marc Flandreau

Marc Flandreau
  • Howard S. Marks Professor of Economic History

Contact Information

Teaching

Past Courses

  • ECON028 - FINANCIAL MELTDOWN

    Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters.

  • ECON029 - BUS, ECON & FIN HISTORY

    Business, Economic and Financial History plays a crucial role today in informing the views of business leaders, policy makers, reformers and public intellectuals. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to acquire a command of the key elements of this important intellectual field. The seminar format enables us to do this engagingly through reading and discussion. Students acquire a knowledge of the fundamental texts and controversies. Each meeting focuses on one foundational debate and provides a means to be up to date with the insights gleaned from rigorous economic history. We will examine twelve important debates and students will be asked to write a paper. The debates will include such questions as: What is growth and how can it be measured? What caused the "great divergence" in long run development among countries? How can we "understand" the rise and fall of slavery and its long shadow today? What is globalization and when did it begin? Did the Gold Standard and interwar fiscal and monetary policy orthodoxy cause the great depression? How can we explain the evolution of inequality in the very long run?

  • HIST131 - FINANCIAL MELTDOWN

    Economic history is increasingly recognized as a crucial source of policy advice and is invoked with growing frequency in public debates. In particular, the subprime crisis in 2008 and after has generated a demand for "historical perspective" that would improve the understanding of the causes of financial turmoil and facilitate the prevention of comparable catastrophes. This course begins with a review of the principal features of the subprime crisis of 2008 and asks, so to speak, "how did we get there?" It answers by providing historical insights that shed light on crucial aspects of financial disasters. This is a history course, engaging with topics pertaining to economics, law and politics (national and international). Students with diverse backgrounds are expected to benefit from this course through acquiring a concrete knowledge of the historical evolution of fundamental institutions of financial capitalism. Ultimately, students enrolling in this course are expected to achieve proficiency in historically informed discussion of the mechanisms that were played out in the subprime crisis and beyond.

  • HIST225 - BUS, ECON & FIN HISTORY

    Business, Economic and Financial History plays a crucial role today in informing the views of business leaders, policy makers, reformers and public intellectuals. This seminar provides students with the opportunity to acquire a command of the key elements of this important intellectual field. The seminar format enables us to do this engagingly through reading and discussion. Students acquire a knowledge of the fundamental texts and controversies. Each meeting focuses on one foundational debate and provides a means to be up to date with the insights gleaned from rigorous economic history. We will examine twelve important debates and students will be asked to write a paper. The debates will include such questions as: What is growth and how can it be measured? What caused the "great divergence" in long run development among countries? How can we "understand" the rise and fall of slavery and its long shadow today? What is globalization and when did it begin? Did the Gold Standard and interwar fiscal and monetary policy orthodoxy cause the great depression? How can we explain the evolution of inequality in the very long run?

  • HIST234 - TOPICS IN TRANSNATIONAL

    Topics vary

  • HIST447 - INFORMATION AND HISTORY

    This course provides a perspective on the role of information as a historical actor. Moving beyond common narratives of the progress of the information economy driven by technological factors, the course underscores the significance of what may be called the political economies of information. We will approach major works, dealing with the historical importance of information (Foucault, Cohn, Habermas) and simultaneously engages with the history of institutions to store and circulate information. We will emphasize the importance of value (social, political, economic) which is at the heart of information gathering and producing. In particular, we will discuss the rise and fall of institutions to store and circulate information. We will study the importance of information in historical processes such as imperialism and colonization, state building, propaganda, the Enlightenment, as well as the informational aspects of the rise of global NGOs and international organization, police and spying. Information may be accumulated or lost; it can be safeguarded or debased; it can confer power or undermine it. In the age of fake news, these are issues worthy of a closer interest.

  • HIST670 - TOPICS:TRANSREGIONAL HIS

    Reading and discussion course on selected topics in Transregional History

  • PPE 401 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Student arranges with a faculty member to pursue a research project on a suitable topic. For more information about research and setting up independent studies, visit: https://ppe.sas.upenn.edu/study/curriculum/independent-studies

Knowledge@Wharton

What Rising Inflation Means for Stock Investors

Familiar hedging options like commodities are no longer safe havens against core inflation, according to new research co-authored by Wharton's Nikolai Roussanov.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 7/20/2021
How Contractors Can Successfully Manage from the Outside

Contractors are outsiders who don’t have the social capital needed to be effective managers, but new research from Wharton’s Peter Cappelli shows how they are leveraging their outsider status for the win.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 7/20/2021
Learning to Be a Better Leader

In his latest book, 'The Edge,' Wharton management professor Michael Useem profiles 10 chief executives and shares their strategies for sustained success.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 7/20/2021