Nina Strohminger

Nina Strohminger
  • Assistant Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    Room 672

Overview

Prof. Strohminger’s research approaches key questions in business ethics through the lens of psychology.

She holds a B.A. in Cognitive Science from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Michigan. She has held postdoctoral fellowships at Duke University and Yale University.

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Teaching

Current Courses

  • LGST100 - Ethics & Social Resp

    This course explores business responsibility from rival theoretical and managerial perspectives. Its focus includes theories of ethics and their application to case studies in business. Topics include moral issues in advertising and sales; hiring and promotion; financial management; corporate pollution; product safety; and decision-making across borders and cultures.

    LGST100004 ( Syllabus )

    LGST100006 ( Syllabus )

    LGST100007 ( Syllabus )

Past Courses

  • LGST100 - ETHICS & SOCIAL RESP

    This course explores business responsibility from rival theoretical and managerial perspectives. Its focus includes theories of ethics and their application to case studies in business. Topics include moral issues in advertising and sales; hiring and promotion; financial management; corporate pollution; product safety; and decision-making across borders and cultures.

Knowledge@Wharton

Equal Health Care for All: A Philosopher’s Answer to a Political Question

An ethically sound health care system requires limits on the private sector, says Wharton's Robert Hughes.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/12/4
Forced Out of Your Job Mid-career? Here’s How to Prepare

Mid- and late-career management is being hollowed out by various forces, leaving experienced workers unprepared to navigate the new world of work, writes Jeff Pundyk in this opinion piece.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/12/3
Can Uber Overcome Its Regulatory Obstacles?

Uber’s latest skirmish with London regulators, which cost the company its license to operate in one of its most lucrative markets, is the result of a flawed culture, Wharton experts say.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/12/3