Nina Strohminger

Nina Strohminger
  • Assistant Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    Room 667

Overview

Prof. Strohminger’s research approaches key questions in business ethics through the lens of psychology.

She holds a B.A. in Cognitive Science from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Michigan. She has held postdoctoral fellowships at Duke University and Yale University.

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Teaching

Current Courses

  • LGST100 - Ethics & S0cial Resp

    This course explores business responsibility from rival theoretical and managerial perspectives. Its focus includes theories of ethics and their application to case studies in business. Topics include moral issues in advertising and sales; hiring and promotion; financial management; corporate pollution; product safety; and decision-making across borders and cultures.

    LGST100002 ( Syllabus )

    LGST100003 ( Syllabus )

Past Courses

  • LGST100 - ETHICS & S0CIAL RESP

    This course explores business responsibility from rival theoretical and managerial perspectives. Its focus includes theories of ethics and their application to case studies in business. Topics include moral issues in advertising and sales; hiring and promotion; financial management; corporate pollution; product safety; and decision-making across borders and cultures.

Knowledge@Wharton

How Automation Could Make Teams Less Efficient — and Less Cooperative

New Wharton research delves into the little-studied question of how human performance and team dynamics are impacted by automation.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/02/21
Seeing Red: Can a Brand Trademark a Signature Color?

Luxury fashion designer Christian Louboutin is fighting to trademark his signature red shoe soles in the European courts. Will he succeed?

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/02/21
How Living Wills Can Work for ‘Too Big To Fail’ Firms

Planning for the possible orderly shut-down of big banks can ensure that shareholders and management "bear the consequences of their decisions" -- not taxpayers, says the outgoing FDIC chair.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/02/21