Edward J. Bergman

Edward J. Bergman
  • Lecturer

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    652 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    3730 Walnut Street
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Overview

Co-Author and General Editor, “Court-Annexed Mediation: Critical Perspectives on Selected State and Federal Programs,” August, 1998, (Pike & Fischer, Inc.). Co-Author, “Beyond Schiavo” approved for publication, Journal of Clinical Ethics (Winter 2007). Teaching: Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School, 1990-1992; Department of Politics, 2001, 2003?; University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Department of Legal Studies, 1995?; University of California at Berkeley/St. Petersburg University Joint Management Program (Russia), 1995-1998; Center for Bioethics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 2005?; IGE (INDIA) LTD, Workshops on Negotiation Skills, 1999-2000. Lectures and Symposia: New Jersey Association of Professional Mediators, 2007; Philadelphia Bar Association, 2006; Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania, 1994, 1999, 2001, 2002; Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, 1993; State University of New York, College at New Paltz, 1992; Federal Practice Update, Mediation and Arbitration in the U.S. District Court, NJSBA Federal Practice & Procedure Committee, 1994. Panelist: Joint Conference on Corporate Governance, St. Petersburg University, 1997 -; Harold R. Medina, Judicial Conference, Princeton University, 1990. Certifications: Mediator, United States District Court, District of New Jersey, 1992?; Mediator, New Jersey Superior Court, 1995?; Business and Commercial Mediator, New Jersey Association of Professional Mediators, 1997?; Advanced Transformative Mediation Skills, U.S. Postal Service, 1998; National Employment Mediation Services Panelist, 1999-2002. Professional and Civic: Director, Mediation Services, Center for Bioethics, University of Pennsylvania, 2006?; Public Defender Princeton Borough, 1986?; Public Defender, Princeton Township, 1989-1991, 1993?; Trustee, Princeton Ballet, 1985-1991; Trustee, Arts Council of Princeton, 1998-2003. Executive Board, Penn Basketball Club, 1996-2003. Trustee, New Jersey Association of Professional Mediators, 2005?.

Continue Reading

Teaching

Current Courses

  • BIOE547 - Mediation Intensive Iii

    Students will have an immersion experience, learning mediation through role-playing simulations. Note that the format is similar to Mediation Intensive I and II, but med. intensive III will NOT duplicate simulations. Students in this course will: learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients, and surrogates through mediation; discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options; role play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators; practice mediation with professional actors; and receive constructive feedback in a supportive environment. Students will also be required to complete a written research paper. 6tudents may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

    BIOE547910

  • BIOE548 - Mediation Intensive Iv

    Students will have an immersion experience, learning mediation through role-playing simulations. Note that the format is similar to earlier mediation intensives but the mediation intensive IV will NOT duplicate simulations. Students in this course will: learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients, and surrogates through mediation; discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options; role play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators; practice mediation with professional actors; use video-tapes of simulations to improve mediation techniques and strengthen interpersonal skills; receive constructive feedback in a supportive environment. Students may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

    BIOE548920

Past Courses

  • BIOE540 - CHALLENGING CLIN. ETHICS

    The contemporary healthcare system in which patients, families, institutions and a multiplicity of caregivers interact over matters of life and death with legal, ethical, emotional and scientific complexities inherently gives rise to a variety of disputes. Such disputes are frequently highly charged and are often emergent in nature. In recent years, mediation has grown exponentially as a dispute resolution mechanism of choice. Not surprisingly, the success of mediation and a wider understanding of the process, has led to its application in the realm of healthcare disputes with encouraging results. This course will initially provide an overview of classical mediation theory and practice. Students will be introduced to negotiation fundamentals critical to the practice of mediation. Similarities and differences between mediation in the healthcare field, as distinct from other contexts, will be examined. All class members will participate in mediation role-plays designed to simulate disputes of the kind prevalent in healthcare landscape

  • BIOE545 - MEDIATION INTENSIVE

    Students will be placed in a variety of clinical situations in which they will play the roles of disputants and mediators, with ongoing discussions and critiques of mediator performance. Each student will be videotaped during their mediation to elicit feedback from the group and to catalyze self-criticism. As distinct from the course, BIOE 540: Challenging Clinical Ethics, in which negotiation and mediation theory are taught as a prelude to clinical simulations, this ocurse references the literature solely in relation to problems encountered in the hands-on mediation of specific cases. Students may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

  • BIOE546 - MEDIATION INTENSIVE II

    Students will have an immersion experience, learning mediation through role-playing simulations. Note that the format is similar to Mediation Intensive I, butthe Mediation Intensive II will NOT duplicate simulations. Students in this course will: learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients, and surrogates through mediation; discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options; role play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators; practice mediation with professional actors;and receive constructive feedback in a supportive environment. Students will also be required to complete a written research paper. Students may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

  • BIOE547 - MEDIATION INTENSIVE III

    Students will have an immersion experience, learning mediation through role-playing simulations. Note that the format is similar to Mediation Intensive I and II, but med. intensive III will NOT duplicate simulations. Students in this course will: learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients, and surrogates through mediation; discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options; role play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators; practice mediation with professional actors; and receive constructive feedback in a supportive environment. Students will also be required to complete a written research paper. 6tudents may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

  • BIOE548 - MEDIATION INTENSIVE IV

    Students will have an immersion experience, learning mediation through role-playing simulations. Note that the format is similar to earlier mediation intensives but the mediation intensive IV will NOT duplicate simulations. Students in this course will: learn to effectively manage clinical disputes among and between caregivers, patients, and surrogates through mediation; discover how to define problems and assess underlying interests to generate mutually acceptable options; role play in a variety of clinical situations as both disputants and mediators; practice mediation with professional actors; use video-tapes of simulations to improve mediation techniques and strengthen interpersonal skills; receive constructive feedback in a supportive environment. Students may take the mediation intensives in any order; they do not need to be taken from I to IV. Students may take all 4 intensive courses, as the material will not be repeated.

  • BIOE550 - BIOETHICS & SOCIETY

    This set of courses will deal with bioethical issues in popular culture addressed from a social science perspective. Courses to be offered include: "Sociology of Bioethics," and "Media and the Doctor-Patient Relationship."

  • BIOE560 - CLN APPRAOCHES TO BIOE

    This set of courses examines issues in bioethics from the perspective of the practicing clinician, physician, nurse, or other health care professional. These courses will often use case studies or clinical experience to analyze or understand contemporary problems in bioethics. An example of such a course is "Clinical Dilemmas Through the Life Cycle."

  • LGST206 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

  • MGMT291 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course includes not only conflict resolution but techniques which help manage and even encourage the valuable aspects of conflict. The central issues of this course deal with understanding the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations in conflict management situations. The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiations as it is practiced in a variety of settings. The course is designed to be relevant to the broad spectrum of problems that are faced by the manager and professional including management of multinationals, ethical issues, and alternative dispute resolutions. Cross listed w/ LGST 206 and OIDD 291.

  • OIDD291 - NEGOTIATIONS

    Negotiation is the art and the science of creating good agreements between two or more parties. This course develops managerial negotiation skills by mixing lectures and practice, using cases and exercises in which students negotiate with each other. The cases cover a wide range of problems and settings: one-shot deals between individuals, repeated negotiations, negotiations over several issues, and negotiations among several parties (both within and between organizations). Class participation and case studies account for half the course grade. Students will also write about a negotiation experience outside of class.

Knowledge@Wharton

What Really Helps Employees to Improve (It’s not Criticism)

Author Marcus Buckingham defied much of HR’s accepted wisdom in his keynote at the recent Wharton People Analytics Conference.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/05/16
Late Bloomers: Why Good Things Come to Those Who Wait

Journalist and self-described late bloomer Rich Karlgaard rejects societal pressure to achieve success at an early age, saying there’s plenty of scientific evidence that many people find their talents later in life.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/05/16
Empowering the Developing World, One Bicycle at a Time

World Bicycle Relief, a nonprofit organization that builds and distributes bicycles in rural areas of the developing world, is the 2019 winner of the Lipman Prize.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/05/16