Matthew Caulfield

Matthew Caulfield
  • PhD Student

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    Jon M. Huntsman Hall Suite 600
    3730 Walnut St.
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: Compensation Ethics, Expressive Business Ethics, Ethics in Strategy

Links: CV, Personal Website

Overview

Matthew Caulfield is a third-year doctoral student and Platt Fellow in Business Ethics. His main research interests are in normative business ethics. He has been so far most interested in rights theory, compensation ethics, and ethics in strategy.
Prior to entering the program, he graduated with a B.S. in Economics summa cum laude from Wharton, with concentrations in Management and Legal Studies & Business Ethics, where he was a Wharton Research Scholar and a PwC Scholar.

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Research

  • Matthew Caulfield (2018), The Expressive Functions of Pay, Business Ethics Journal Review, 6, pp. 1-6. 10.12747/bejr2018.06.01

    Abstract: Jeffrey Moriarty argues that unequal pay for employees who do the same work is not necessarily wrong, but can be wrong if it is discriminatory or deceptive. Moriarty does this in part by stressing that pay should be considered primarily as a price for labor and therefore that our views on price discrimination and unequal pay should mirror each other. In this critique, I argue that Moriarty fails to adequately account for the expressive functions of pay. A pluralist view of pay reveals otherwise overlooked normative concerns regarding pay and cautions against adopting too strong of an analytical connection between price discrimination and unequal pay.

Awards and Honors

  • Society for Business Ethics Founders’ Award, 2017
  • Platt Fellowship in Business Ethics, 2017-2021
  • Marc and Diane Spilker Corporate Governance Fund Award, 2017
  • Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative Student Fellowship, 2017
  • George James First-Year Doctoral Fellowship, 2016-2017

In the News

Activity

Latest Research

Matthew Caulfield (2018), The Expressive Functions of Pay, Business Ethics Journal Review, 6, pp. 1-6. 10.12747/bejr2018.06.01
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In the News

Two Virginia counties did the improbable: They replaced their voting machines

Matthew Caulfield and Michael Windle explain how the market structure of the voting-technology industry is a core cause of the stagnation that keeps voters across the United States using machines more than 10 years old.

Washington Post - 07/07/2017
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Awards and Honors

Society for Business Ethics Founders’ Award 2017
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